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BLOG Great Depressurization Chamber LIVE SHOWS Reno Uncategorized

Reno Events Center DO’S and DONT’S – RL Grime “Nova Tour” Sunday Oct. 22nd

October 20, 2017
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This gives you the 411 on everything you need to know for the RL GRIME NOVA TOUR at Reno Events Center. Keep in mind, we will be updating this page as we receive more info (such as set times, etc) so keep checking back and also make sure you are checking the EVENT PAGE ON FACEBOOK for up-to-date info. Also, follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @freshbakin for live posts.
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POST-BURN ROOM DISCOUNTS! WHO NEEDS ROOM DISCOUNTS?

August 9, 2016
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Howdy all! You need room discounts for after the Burn? We have em for you. Whether you are on a budget or really want to splurge, take a look at all the room discounts available via our downtown partners. Staying downtown puts you right near the big event, Pretty Lights + massive TBA at the Reno Events Center on September 6th! You can grab some tickets now or pick them up when you arrive. There are still some $36 tickets left at online then they go up to $40

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Your Skrillex Openers: Vindata, Psy Fi, and Richard Xavier.

May 27, 2016
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Vindata

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“Vindata is the brainchild of Branden Ratcliff and Jared Poythress based in Los Angeles, California. Blending rugged hip hop beats with deep R&B passions, and indie-pop sensibilities; the pair are on a mission to expand how we define dance music. After notable underground success with their last EP “…For One To Follow” [Symbols] , the duo are back with a brand new EP titled “Through Time And Space…” [OWSLA], another piece of their discography puzzle depicting the human experience. This time around, they’ve crafted a 6 track journey through different perceptions of different realities. The result is a cohesive body of energetic yet lush textures, polyrhythmic percussion, and soulful vocals.” – OWSLA


“It’s been two years since Vindata members Branden and Jared launched their production and DJ project. Since then, they’ve released a debut EP on Kastle’s Symbols Recordings, remixed A-Trak, Ellie Goulding, Alex Metric, Odesza, Clean Bandit, Jack Ü, and more, reached multi-millions of plays on SoundCloud, and signed with OWSLA, who will be releasing their upcoming Through Time And Space EP.

Their sound, which has grown and adapted alongside both the club and festival scenes over the years, has always been rooted in catchy melodies, human grooves and forward thinking production. Their upcoming EP takes elements from each of their previous original and remix works—bright and energetic chords blasts, hi-res tropics, and dynamic pop structures—and pairs them with a set of talented vocalists, further defining the duo’s impressive approach to accessible dance vibes.” –NestHQ.com

PSY FiFresh Bakin Psy Fi blog 002

Standing at the galactic crossroads of connectivity and combustion is melodic music manipulator Miles Ross, aka Psy Fi. His bass heavy yet playful rhythms spark a beautiful resonance in the ear and a swagger in the hips of the beholder. His music celebrates boundless splendor that pulls you through the looking glass into another place. The music is a passionate indefinable translation of lust, sensuality and movement. 

“One of the most versatile communities in electronic music these days is that of the growing psy-trap sect. These producers use heavy bass and alien flavors to create an environment capable of immersing any size crowd and they have done so for years now, making those otherworldy noises now familiar, but ever so choice. In a genre full of powerhouse performers, one to watch is Miles Ross aka Psy Fi and his new EP Colors showcases why that is.” – The UNTZ

 

 

Richard Xavier

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Richard Xavier likes to make people sweat in spontaneous dance parties that tend to last several days. Known for his cinematic DJ selections and amplified live performances, Richard Xavier has performed alongside some of electronic music’s heaviest hitters including The Glitch Mob, Eprom, TroyBoi, Luminox, and Tincup (to name a few.)
Richard Xavier has been a featured performer for Trap City SF, Future Strange presents “The BOOM,” and Fresh Bakin’s “Great Depressurization Chamber” events and made his debut Stilldream Festival appearance in 2015. Be on the look out for this young DJ in 2016, with new music releases and festival performances you will not want to miss.

 

 

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Introducing… Android Jones

May 26, 2016
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“I have seen things in this life that I am incapable of translating into words. In my practice I have visited realms where the imagination ends, and the terrifying beauty of infinity unfolds over and over again. If I could distill into words exactly what motivates me to create the art that I make than it would not be worth making it. Instead I have chosen the Pen. Read more

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The Ladies of the MOTHERSHIP

March 26, 2016
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For nearly 20-years hosts Heklina & Peaches Christ have curated some of San Francisco’s most notorious drag acts, loaded them on to a bus, and staged a full scale invasion of Reno on Easter weekend. Formerly known as “TrannyShack” these performances have wowed audiences around the globe, from the heart of San Francisco to the stages of Los Angeles, New York, London, and beyond.

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Introducing… Kaminanda

February 9, 2016
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The emergence of Kaminanda’s organic skill has landed him on the crest of spiritually conscious music. His debut release “Syntropic Luminosity” in 2008 introduced the world to his signature style of world sounds marked by glitch modulation, producing a highly psychedelic audio experience which has continued to evolve throughout Kaminanda’s six studio albums.

Kaminanda’s self proclaimed mission statement is “to produce and perform music that uplifts the spirit of the listener.” He has described his style with labels like tribal elfstep, trip hop, spacefunk and gypsy step, stating that his sound is designed to take the listener on a journey reflecting the evolution of our collective consciousness.”

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Having sprouted from the musically conscious region of Vancouver, Canada, his gypsy sound has hit music festivals such as Shambhala, Symbiosis, Lightning In a Bottle and Burning Man, and is internationally known at festivals like Envision, Boom and Eclipse Australia. He entwines the barrier of live and electronic perfectly, dark and light, future and ancient, constantly moving dancers back and forth through the tipping point at the center of his eclectic style.

In addition to continuing collaborations with artists like Ganga Giri, Rara Avis and Adham Shaikh, Kaminanda has worked both in the studio and on live sets with the WASSABI COLLECTIVE (2001-2004) and performed alongside artists such as Eoto, Desert Dwellers, Tipper, Ott and Bird of Prey.

Kaminanda is performing live in Reno on Thurs, February 11, 2016.

CLICK HERE FOR FREE ENTRY before 11 with online RSVP.

 

Connect with this Artist:
https://soundcloud.com/kaminanda
https://kaminanda.bandcamp.com
https://www.facebook.com/Kaminanda.music
https://twitter.com/kaminanda
https://www.instagram.com/kaminanda

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An Interview with poster artist Scotty Roller // Rock City Posters

March 5, 2015
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We are poster nerds. This started back in the 80’s when we plastered our rooms in Sisters of Mercy, Metallica, Ramones, Jane’s Addiction posters and the front of CD cases when they came in the large cardboard boxes. Seeing the first 1960’s San Francisco poster art really drew us in to the art and magic of not only the posters to market an event, but the commemorative posters as well. Watching the commemorative poster scene explode even more, where sometimes a band would make posters for just a pinnacle show, now they are making them for every show. We took it upon ourselves to create posters for the “big” shows we brought to Reno back in the day, which basically were Bassnectar, The Glitch Mob and The Bounce, but also did posters for lowRIDERz and the infamous show of NastyNasty, Katey Red and BLVD.

Imagine how stoked we were, when driving through Midtown, we saw a new store called Rock City Posters. Opened by Scotty Roller, of Scotty Roller Designs, the shop sits right between the Chocolate Walrus and Sierra Nevada Chocolate. Go visit! The store is really awesome, with a huge variety of posters from around the world, new and vintage, plus t-shirts and other swag. Plus you can have posters sent out to be framed there, as well as they may purchase a print you have around the house.

If you are into posters, sit down and enjoy this interview with Scotty Roller. It’s kind of long, BUT WELL WORTH IT.

FB: State your name and where you are from.

SR: Scotty Roller. I’m from Anaheim, California.

FB: How did you end up in Reno? When do you move here?

SR: My wife and I moved here in 1996. We were going to move somewhere out of Anaheim but weren’t sure where. She had an interview for a teaching position here, she sent me a postcard of downtown during Hot August Nights with the neon on the casinos, the hot rods and the whole bit. I started packing sight unseen. Before she went on that interview I didn’t even know Reno existed. In fact, no one I told where I was moving knew where it was either. My whole day-to-day life was in Orange County and, on occasion, in L.A. for a show or something. No one in Southern California ever leaves the immediate area.  Since then, I’ve been all across the entire U.S. multiple times, Europe repeatedly and can’t wait to see the rest of the world. Moving here kick-started my travel itch of wanting to experience other countries and places I would’ve never been able to see.
I still have a strong love for Anaheim and visit quite a bit during the year, but I also like living in Reno too. There’s a lot of great things being here has afforded me and not to mention the small things like not sitting in traffic or struggling for parking. I love Reno for what it is.

saddle tramps roller
Saddle Tramps • by Scotty Roller

FB: How did you get into the poster art world and making posters?

SR: The first posters I made were actually ink drawn punk rock keg party fliers for some friends in high school. Every Friday there was a raging party that these guys wanted a flier done for and being in Orange County, our local bands were Social Distortion, The Vandals, T.S.O.L., Doggystyle, Cadillac Tramps, China White, Insted, Agent Orange and on and on so they were always on these fliers for these parties. I’d get paid once in a while $20 or some skateboard parts or something really minimal but it wasn’t about the money at all then. It was way more fun drawing these fliers in class as opposed to doing what I should have been doing.

I made all the posters for my band, The Saddle Tramps years later, and would do posters for other bands as well but I really got my chops doing 2-3 posters a week for the Tramps in early 2000’s when we were touring constantly. Later when the economy tanked and all the graphic artists in town were tripping over each other to get the big corporate clients and jobs, I realized I had an address book full of band’s numbers that I’d met over the years and so I started reaching out to them saying, “Hey let’s make a poster for your show”. I started one at a time, and then the hustle was back on just like it was in the 80’s and early 90’s for me. Finding out how to reach these band’s managers and decision makers, getting permission to do them, and then the hard part…..getting paid. Once I did enough of them the bands started commissioning me and it sort of took off.

After all that, you’ve got to get involved in the poster community as an artist. This is by participating in Flatstocks, API events, and hopefully the other artists accept what you’re contributing and bringing to the table. If you’re not bringing anything to the party so to speak, they won’t run you out of town but they won’t make it easy for you. I’ve seen some artists try and get into this, and they just flop and fail miserably. As a poster artist, you not only have to have your art game on, you’ve got to be able to print (even if you’re having someone else print your stuff, you still have to know how to do it, and have done enough of it), and the biggest thing is you have to be a good enough hustler to get on the phone with the managers of these bands and get approved and hired to do this work. You can’t just make a gig poster because you feel like it, especially if it’s being sold. The minute a poster is exchanged for money it becomes a piece of merchandise, and if you don’t have the approval or the permission to have done that poster, you just made bootlegged merch and that damages bands, venues and all involved. There’s rules to this shit. Rules and ethics that have to be followed and played by.

FB: Any educational background in art?

SR: I took an art class in high school my senior year. More because of a girl that I was trying to get with than anything. I went out with her once and couldn’t stand her so the whole thing backfired. I tried to take two different art classes at Fullerton Junior College and dropped out of both. I hated them. I did manage to meet my wife there though so it wasn’t all that bad. Haha!!!

If given the opportunity again, I’d have pulled my head out of my ass and gone to Art Institute or Cal Arts and done it properly. I always wanted to work at Disney Animation Studios, and then Pixar came along and thought that would be the ultimate. I know plenty of people who could have been the connection I needed to get in there but they all said without a proper degree and training from those schools, they won’t even take your call or portfolio. And it’s true. I submitted my portfolio and resume repeatedly. Go to school kids! DON’T do it the way I did.

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Rock City Posters • 1286 S Virginia St

FB: How did the Rock City Posters concept happen? It’s an awesome store.

SR: Two defining moments. Two years ago in Hamburg at a Flatstock another poster artist friend of mine (who does great work) was bummed out and said, “How are you selling so much already and you’re not even set up? I haven’t sold anything.” The answer in my mind was pretty cut and dry especially since I have been the guy that doesn’t sell anything before. Art is subjective. You’re not doing anything right or wrong, it’s just a matter of people’s taste. But then the first “A-Ha” moment came to me where I thought, what If I wasn’t selling anything but the other 39 artists are. If I was getting a piece of the action from all of these artists I would be making something and not nothing. I need an outlet to sell my posters, and posters from other artists.

The second moment that really made my mind up was an invitational poster show in Dresden called Colored Gigs that my friend Lars Krause puts on. It’s in a venue called Scheune and it is all black inside, unfinished concrete floors, a stage at one end that bands were playing on, a DJ at the opposite end playing records between bands and all while this is going on, we had hung our posters from the ceiling like drapes and people were walking the aisles looking and buying posters while music played. It was incredible. I knew I had to bottle that feeling and experience and bring it home. We had nothing like that anywhere.

Since I’ve opened Lars and countless poster artists and studios have rallied behind me and championed my efforts. It does wonders for all of us. It brings their art to a place that has never seen their work, they make some money, I make money and on top of it all, it’s all done in a proper environment. I know it’s been done right even in it’s infancy because tourists and visitors come in and take their photos next to the door, the stage, the sofas. It’s crazy. They buy the posters, the t-shirts and post their stuff online and most importantly they leave with a smile on their face and happy and a lot of times it was their first introduction to gig posters at all. It makes me feel good that my passion for it can cross all demographic lines and make people happy.

Poster from Cargo's St Paul and The Broken Bones show • By Scotty Roller
Poster from Cargo’s St Paul and The Broken Bones show

FB: What do you look for in posters to sell? School us on the art of poster making and the business behind collecting them.

SR: There’s a huge science to it and we could be here for days talking about it, but in a nutshell here’s the theory behind the posters we buy: 1) Is it real? We buy directly from the artists as often as possible to ensure that. When we consign a collection from someone we are looking to make sure it’s the real deal. If there is a poster in question or in doubt about where it came from, or who made it we decline it. We do what we can to shut down and stop poster counterfeiting. Same thing with the vintage stuff. We’re looking at how it was printed, what it is, which there are several resources we use to authenticate that stuff. 2) In Reno, people buy posters based on the band almost 95% of the time. Seldom are they buying the poster based on the artist or subject matter. So that’s a huge deciding factor. I need posters that I can sell within 3 months. If I think I can move them in that time frame they’re a good investment for me. If I think for a second it’s questionable about moving in that time frame, I’ll pass on it.

As a poster collector……buy the ones you like. Plain and simple. It’s art. Art is supposed to make you happy and feel good when you look at it. If a poster does that for you, then get it. I personally don’t collect posters any more but when I am buying one for my personal collection it is of a show that I was at, or it’s a historically rare and important poster that’s almost impossible to get your hands on.

Poster for Umphrey's McGee by Scotty Roller
Poster for Umphrey’s McGee by Scotty Roller

FB: What are some of the “Holy Grails” of posters? Rare ones people are seeking out.

SR: The most sought after and highly valuable posters are without question the 60’s Bill Graham posters. Mint condition first printings are what people want and some can fetch as much as a new car. The 1966 Beatles poster from their show at Candlestick Park in San Francisco has brought as much as $57,000. We have a signed and numbered mint second printing of that poster. There were 48 made and we have number 14.  We also have a flier from Nirvana’s show in April of 1991 at The OK Hotel in Seattle where they played “Smells Like Teen Spirit” for the first time. We got that from a friend who was at that show and took the flier from the venue. We’ve got an autographed Ramones flier from 1980 from a show in San Francisco with The Plastics, I’ve got a portrait snapshot of Sammy Davis Jr. with a handbill from the show where the photo was taken backstage in 1964 at The Riviera in Las Vegas. We’ve got scores of vintage Rolling Stones posters, The Clash, Iron Maiden, Cream, 90’s era Fillmore posters from bands like Red Hot Chili Peppers, we’ve got older first wave screen printed posters from artists like Marco Almera, Tara McPherson, Frank Kozik, Jermaine Rogers, etc.

I own a snapshot of poster artist Rick Griffin drawing the Jimi Hendrix poster with the flying eyeball. I got the photo from the photographer who took it in 1967. It’s an original unpublished snapshot. I’m trying to get the first printing of that poster that he was drawing so that I can frame them and hang them side by side. Unfortunately, finding that poster is like getting your hands on an artifact from the Titanic, and when it does come up it sells for around $15,000. It’s all about the chase and the hunt to get one. We have a few rare posters like that. One is going to auction at Christie’s in London in March. That is a Thirteenth Floor Elevators poster from 1966.

On the press • Earls of Leicester • By Scotty Roller
Hot off the press

FB: Who are your favorite poster artists?

SR: My favorite posters are from Hatch Show Prints in Nashville and Globe Poster Company. Globe did all the soul revue posters in the 50’s and 60’s for The Apollo Theater and the like. They used neon inks, halftone photos and they were true wild vibrant graphics that sold excitement. They were the polar opposite of understated posters like you see today. They were advertising pieces that subsequently were an unintentional art style. I love Hatch Show Prints because they have a distinct style, the type blocks were all hand cut, and their posters are hand done but simple, recognizable and they never changed.

FB: What do you see as the biggest failure people have in designing posters?

SR: The biggest failure I see is that people get so wrapped up in the design that they forget what it is. A gig poster is a piece of advertising that should look so cool that it makes you want to go to that show, and when you get there should make you want to buy that poster. A gig poster is a catchy hook to a song. If you remember that poster it worked. If you can’t remember it, it missed the mark.

buzzcocks roller
Buzzcocks • Detroit • By Scotty Roller

FB: What advice can you give aspiring visual artists in the concert poster world?

SR: My advice is this, and it can be transposed for any career. Even if you’re a mechanic or a bus driver: Don’t do it for the money or to get into the shows for free. Do it because it’s your one true passion in life. If it’s truly the one thing you feel that you were put here to do, then go for it. Draw every day. Even if you’re using a computer to make them, you have to know how to draw by hand. If you don’t, you’re not gonna last very long or go very far. Learn how to hand letter. Become a tracing pro. You’re gonna need it. Learn how to use a brush to ink. Once you’ve got this down, get your computer stuff together. The last thing, don’t use pre-distressed fonts. Distress them yourself.

The last big thing is, find your style. Even if you like to design in different styles, make it so people know you did it. And when other know-so-much designers start criticizing, discounting your work or passing you off as a hack make sure they see your middle finger and hear you clearly when you tell them to piss off. Just like Andy Warhol said, “Art is what you can get away with” and Shepard Fairey said it even better, “People like to talk shit but it’s usually to justify their own apathy.”

FB: Any particular fanboy moment where you say “I can’t believe I am making a poster for this artist?”

SR: I’ve been very fortunate in my life through playing in bands and making posters that a lot of people who I looked up to over the years have become friends, acquaintances and clients. I never get star-struck over doing posters for a band. I’ve done posters for some big artists who I have really admired and they have been super cool. They’re just like you and I. I have done a poster for one artist who I looked up to and he was so schizophrenic I squashed the deal. Another artist I did a poster for gave me more grief than I could ever express and it only made me respect him more because he was that way when no one was looking. It wasn’t a put-on. Every one else has been insanely nice and easy to work with for the most part.  I’d imagine if I got a chance to do a poster for Chuck Berry and he wasn’t a complete dick I’d probably be a little giddy.